WE ARE HARDLY EVER WRONG
 
 
 
 
Angus Blitter - Your host and resident media whore. Angus is the founder of Hack Sec Klahn, a like-minded group of technologists who believe diversity is good for the species. He has a day job but its not something he likes to talk about ;)

Opening Remarks - Who, What, Why

DNS:The Internet's Dirty Little Secret

The very definition of critical infrastructure, DNS is used and "trusted" by everyone (almost) on the Internet. We will explore all the reasons not to trust DNS and how you can limit your exposure to vulnerable DNS services or exploit them for your own benefit

Closing Remarks - Next Year - Let's Party!!!
Sergey Bratus - For the past five years, Sergey Bratus post-doc research at Dartmouth's Institute for Security Technology Studies was related to application of information theory and machine learning to log analysis and other security topics. Before that, he worked as a research scientist at BBN on applications of similar techniques to Natural Language Processing, English text and speech.

"I argue that introducing entropy-based features and visualization
techniques to log and traffic analysis allows analysts to divine
otherwise hidden anomalies and organize the data in ways to better
"connect the dots".

Entropy and related information measures provide a way to describe the overall shape of data distributions in logs. This makes it easier to notice anomalous values, to cluster and summarize records for convenient browsing, and to notice correlations that may be hard to find otherwise. For large logs, it is easy to get lost scrolling down many screens of records; with entropic measures one can get the general idea of the composition of a data set and the most likely places to look for an anomaly. By adding visualization tools to the mix we can provide meaningful data organization that can significantly speed up log analysis and find hidden relationships. I will demonstrate a new log viewing tool and processing REAL data from several "interesting" sources"
Enno Rey - Loves playing around with network protocols and devices since the early 90s. Prior to founding a specialized team of security researchers (aka building his own company) in 2001 he worked as a sysadmin and network operator. He has vast experience in designing, operating, troubleshooting and securing laaarge networks and regularly contributes to the security community as a writer of whitepapers and articles, conference speaker or just as a pentester and protocol scientist.

Advanced Protocol Fuzzing - What We Learned when Bringing Layer2 Logic to "SPIKE Land"

The talk is based on a research project whose goal was to evaluate the security of network devices used in carrier space. After some (short) introduction into the main concepts of fuzzing (in particular of network protocols) we will explain which options of existing fuzzers and frameworks we found and why we finally chose SPIKE. Given SPIKE has no Layer2 functionality by default we were forced to write some additional modules like a (libnet-based) generic Layer 2 packet generator and lots of SPK-scripts for different protocols. We will describe this development process, the pitfalls and lessons learned. Furthermore we will release all the code and discuss the results of performing extensive fuzz-testing of network devices and some common operating systems.

Virtualization Insecurity

The talk will cover the security aspects of virtulization and discuss attack paths and mitigating controls. After some theoretical analysis of possible attack paths we will focus on two of the most promising ones (attacks from the guest against the host and attacks against the common management platform). Additionally we will discuss the first results from a research project and demonstrate we can (as of august 2007) perform some reproducible attacks against wide spread virtualization solutions.
Simon Rich - Works as a security researcher for Germany based ERNW GmbH. Fiddling around with hardware and low level protocol stuff makes the majority of his days. He has contributed to finding several protocol flaws in the past and is known for innovative approaches to (depending who's the customer) implementing or breaking the security of technologies.

Advanced Protocol Fuzzing - What We Learned when Bringing Layer2 Logic to "SPIKE Land"

The talk is based on a research project whose goal was to evaluate the security of network devices used in carrier space. After some (short) introduction into the main concepts of fuzzing (in particular of network protocols) we will explain which options of existing fuzzers and frameworks we found and why we finally chose SPIKE. Given SPIKE has no Layer2 functionality by default we were forced to write some additional modules like a (libnet-based) generic Layer 2 packet generator and lots of SPK-scripts for different protocols. We will describe this development process, the pitfalls and lessons learned. Furthermore we will release all the code and discuss the results of performing extensive fuzz-testing of network devices and some common operating systems.
Michael Thumann - Is Chief Security Officer and head of the ERNW "Research" and "Pen-Test" teams. He has published security advisories regarding topics like 'Cracking IKE Prshared Keys' and Buffer Overflows in Web Servers/VPN Software/VoIP Software. Michael enjoys sharing his self-written security tools (e.g. 'tomas—a Cisco Password Cracker', ikeprobe—IKE PSK Vulnerability Scanner' or 'dnsdigger—a dns information gathering tool') and his experience with the community. Besides numerous articles and papers he wrote the first (and only) german Pen-Test Book that has become a recommended reading at german universities. In addition to his daily pentesting tasks he is a regular conference-speaker and has also contributed exploit code to the Metasploit Framework. With more than 10 years of experience in computer security Michaels' main interest is to uncover vulnerabilities and security design flaws from the network to the application level.

Hacking Second Life(TM)

Beyond being an online game SecondLife is a growing marketplace for big companies where lots of money is made. Living and acting in a virtual world gives the people the opportunity to do things they would never do in real life. Therefore it is not surprising that SecondLife has increasingly attracted real world hackers. This talk will cover the basic architecture of SecondLife and point out the possible attack vectors against SecondLife itself, but will also demonstrate hacks from the inside of SecondLife against real-life systems in the internet. So watch out what virtualization can do for the "Bad Guys".


  12:00PM - 8:00PM
Registration and Check In
Vendor Area Opens
   

  7:00AM - 8:30PM Registration

8:30AM - 9:00AM

Opening Remarks (Angus Blitter)

9:00AM - 10:30AM
Advanced Protocol Fuzzing (Enno & Simon)

10:30AM - 10:45AM
Break

10:45AM - 12:00PM
Visualizing Entropy In Logs (Sergey Bratus)

12:00PM - 1:00PM Lunch

1:00PM - 1:30PM
HackSec Invitational: Packetwars Highlights

1:30PM - 1:45PM
Break

1:45PM - 3:00PM

Virtualization Insecurity (Enno Rey)

3:00PM - 3:15PM Break

3:15PM - 4:00PM
DNS: The Internet's Dirty Little Secret (Angus Blitter)

4:00PM - 4:15PM Break

4:15PM - 5:30PM
Hacking Second Life (TM) (Michael Thumann)

5:30PM - 6:00PM
Closing Remarks (Angus Blitter)

6:00PM - 7:30PM Cocktail Party/Mixer

8:00PM - ??? VIP Party (Rock On Dude!!!)
   

  Sleep In, Eat Breakfast, Go Home